Follow Us on Twitter

A Scale Factor Less than 1 (Mathematics Lesson)

A Scale Factor Less than 1

An enlargement with a scale factor less than 1 makes a shape smaller.



The image is smaller than the object.

A scale factor less than 1 can be thought of as a fractional scale factor. The scale factor will often be written as a fraction, like 12, 13 or 14.

A Real Example of a Scale Factor Less than 1

The shape below has been enlarged by a scale factor of 12:



All lengths in the image are 12× the lengths in the object.

More Real Examples of a Scale Factor Less than 1

  • The shape below has a scale factor of 13:



    The scale factor can be found by dividing the length of the image by the corresponding length of the object.
    scale factor = 2 ÷ 6 = 13

  • The shape below has a scale factor of 14:



    The scale factor can be found by dividing the length of the image by the corresponding length of the object.
    scale factor = 6 ÷ 24 = 14
Curriculum
Geometry Lessons
Interactive Test
  show
 
Note
WHAT IS A SCALE FACTOR?

The scale factor describes how much bigger (or smaller) the enlarged shape is compared to the original shape.



The scale factor multiplies each length of the shape.

For example, if the scale factor is 12, each side in the enlarged shape is 12 the length in the original shape.

OTHER TYPES OF SCALE FACTOR

If the scale factor is greater than 1, the enlarged shape gets bigger:



If the scale factor is less than 1, the enlarged shape gets smaller: